Alex Clark-McGlenn

Read Alex Clark-McGlenn’s “The Sign For Grief Is Crow.”

1. What made you want to become a writer?

Growing up I was severely dyslexic. I didn’t read a book until I was in 8th grade. In that same year, my English teacher shared some of the works of Edgar Allan Poe and ee cummings with our class. I was so captivated by these writers, especially Poe and The Tell Tale Heart. I thought, hey, why can’t I write like that? For some reason the ambition stuck and I’ve been writing ever since.

2. What is your genre or writing style and has it changed over time?

I wouldn’t want to be clumped in with a single genre, frankly. People are multifaceted creatures, it seems strange that authors should confine themselves to one genre. As a reader I enjoy everything from Literature (yeah, with a capital L), like Cormac McCarthy, to fantasy like Patrick Rothfuss. My reading tastes, however typically hide in between these two forms of writing, such as Margaret Atwood and Haruki Murakami. Similar to my reading tastes, I try to write something I’d want to read.

3. What has helped you the most in the writing pursuit?

My MFA, which I got at the Northwest Institute of Literary Arts. Sadly, the program closed down last August, but the education it gave me has made me grow as a writer like I never thought I would. While many people wonder what an MFA in creative writing is good for, NILA challenged me in so many ways. I remember my first semester in the program. I was so awed by the level of detail faculty and students gave to their work. I didn’t even know that type of care existed within writing. I wouldn’t have the understanding and passion for fiction I do today without the faculty and friends that supported me while I was in that program.

4. How would you describe your writing practice?

I don’t really think about “the writing practice,” anymore. Much of my income comes from freelance writing, which I’m thankful for. These days, if I don’t write, I don’t pay the bills–so my practice has become my job in many respects. But I wouldn’t say I enjoy it any less because of this. While it’s a job, it’s a job I love (nearly) everyday. I usually do a freewrite for myself each morning, I’m also part of a weekly critique group, which helps keep me on track. But it’s not a struggle like it once was. It just feels like my life.

5. What are you writing now?

I’m working on a novel which has gone through several drafts. Hopefully I’ll be searching for an agent in the next couple months, as I’ve gotten some good feedback from those who have read it and I believe it’s very close. I also have a short, “Lovecraftian,” horror story I’m working on. I feel it’s one of my more clever pieces, but it’s still in an early draft.

6. Where can someone find out more about your work?

My website is probably the best place to look: alexclarkmcg.com. I have links to all the magazines and anthologies I’ve been published in, such as Best New Writing 2016, eFiction, and others. I’m active on Twitter as well, @alexclarkmcg, and always appreciate some discussion on writing.

Sean Gill

Read Sean Gill’s “Past Lives, Now Available on Videocassette.”

1. What made you want to become a writer?

I wrote my first “book” at age seven. It was called Deserted! and was about twenty pages long, illustrated, comb bound, and somehow incredibly derivative of both Robinson Crusoe and the Jabba’s Palace scenes from Return of the Jedi. I went on to work in the local theater during my adolescence and began writing plays. Eventually, I became interested in film and studied it in college. By the time I’d graduated and moved to New York, I’d long ago left prose by the wayside and considered myself purely a filmmaker/playwright.

Interestingly enough, it was film that brought me back to prose. One of my most formative post-college experiences was the honor of studying with one of my cinematic heroes, Werner Herzog. Werner emphasized the importance of reading and writing (among other things, such as traveling by foot) and encouraged me to try prose again, as a kind of backbone for my film work (which is often silent and surrealistic). It began with a few experiments, then a few dozen stories, and finally, a novel. I still make films and write plays, but it’s possible that prose writing stands the tallest among my artistic interests.

2. What is your genre or writing style and has it changed over time?

My first professional stories were hard science fiction, but I haven’t revisited the genre in years. I’d say most of my recent work has been some blend of literary, magical realist, and speculative elements, though every once in a while I’m inspired and write a pure horror story, a hardboiled noir, or something that’s none of these things.

3. What has helped you the most in the writing pursuit?

Maybe it’s cliché, but I have to say reading—voracious reading. I compulsively manage my holds queue at the local library, fiction and non-fiction alike. It was the first place in my neighborhood where everybody knew my name, and now they even shout “Sean!” when I walk through the doors, like I’m Norm on Cheers.

4. How would you describe your writing practice?

Every day—even when I don’t feel like it, even when I’m working a day job—I prime the pump and write for at least twenty minutes. If nothing decent comes from the effort, I’m happy to move on to other pursuits, and there are plenty of days when that’s the case. I find that I yield my best results when I can wake up, roll out of a dream, and get straight to writing with no distractions along the way: no checking my phone, email, the news, etc.

5. What are you writing now?

I’m putting the finishing touches on my first novel, which is set in a near-future New York City and details the social unrest surrounding a controversial event known as “The Borough War.”

6. Where can we find out more about your work?

If you go to www.seangillfilms.com you can learn more about my films, my plays, and my prose—the “Publications” tab will lead you to a number of my stories that are available online.

L.P. Lee


Read L.P. Lee’s “Hibakusha” in East Asia.

1. What made you want to become a writer?

So far I’ve tended to do bursts of writing separated by sometimes quite long intervals doing something else. What makes me want to write each time is a bit different to the last. Today I like writing because my last interval away from it made me appreciate again how stimulating it is. Exercising your imagination, your critical thinking, stops you from becoming too institutionalised or complacent in how you view the world.

2. Why do you write magical realism?

I love how it’s a special space to bring intriguing, seemingly disparate ideas together, that can hopefully give a fresh perspective on the human condition. I’ve found it to be a flexible way to approach themes that have interested me at one point or another: rawness vs. maturity (‘The Jars’), outsider vs. insider (‘The White Fox’), the grounded body vs. transcendent self (‘Hibakusha’). 

That being said, I also enjoy genres like dark comedy, science fiction and historical fiction. To some extent there aren’t always boundaries and genre can be in the eye of the beholder. I’ve had the same story be published on fantasy, magical realism and horror platforms. It’s fascinating how each genre has its own traditions and motifs and seminal works, and it’s also really fun to see how we can cross borders and dabble in fusion. 

3. What has helped you the most in the writing pursuit?

Filling my life with people who are kind and interested in the world around them. Their perspectives enrich my own understanding of the world and my place within it. If I want to become a better writer, much of that is in bettering my mind and spirit.

4. How would you describe your writing practice?

Cross-legged. This is my favourite way to write. Because you can’t really sit cross-legged when out and about in the UK (except for a precious sunny day in a park), it also feels like a treat! I associate it with good memories from South Korea – sitting on beautiful silk mats when dining on delicious food, cooling off by a mountain stream in the depths of a humid summer, and drinking sweet shikhye in the lounge of a public sauna.

5. What are you writing now?

I’m working on a virtual reality project with film-maker Gaelle Mourre and a French production company.

6. Where can someone find out more about your work?

You can find out more on my website (www.l-p-lee.com) and also on Twitter (@LPLee_author) 🙂

Sandor Kovacs

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Read Sandor Kovac’s “The Girl in the Flowery Dress.”

1. What made you want to become a writer?

In my early twenties, I became the singer of a rock band, and I wrote all the lyrics. I believe, this was the point in my life when I began to enjoy the game of words.

I wrote my first short story in Hungarian (my native language) about three years ago. Of course, it wasn’t the best piece of mine, but writing it down relieved me because the idea haunted me for a long time. My friends liked it, so they encouraged me to write more. Their positive feedback was the rock that started the avalanche, and here I am, now writing in English too, hoping that once I can be a full-time professional author.

2. What is your genre or writing style and has it changed over time?

My favorite genres are horror, science fiction, and fantasy when it comes to reading. I love all of them equally. But probably I’m more like a horror, dark fantasy writer.

My style hasn’t changed yet; in fact, it’s still forming. However, I’m planning to write more sci-fi in the future.

3. What has helped you the most in the writing pursuit?

Other writers’ works and the support I’ve received from my family.

4. How would you describe your writing practice?

I make a note of my ideas into a notebook or my phone, whichever is closer to me. I pick one, research it and scribble the first draft to get it out of my head. Then, I let it rest for a while (usually for four weeks), and then I start to edit it. I go through every piece several times before I show it to anyone. Later, based on feedback, I finalize the story, copy edit it, and send it out to magazines. I write or edit something every day.

Recently, I discovered that writing went quite well when I was travelling. Since, I always make sure that I have my laptop or my notebook with me.

5. What are you writing now?

I have a few short story and flash fiction ideas, so I am working on those at the moment. Also, I am planning to self-publish a short story collection next year, titled The Apocalyptic Choir. It will contain my post-apocalyptic and dystopian themed stories.

If I manage to accomplish all these, I will begin to write my first novel. The idea is in my head, and I’m excited and afraid of starting it at the same time. But this is the nature of big projects.

6. Where can someone find out more about your work?

I’m in the process of creating my author website, where I will publish flash fictions and other interesting things. You can visit the site at sandor-kovacs.com.

Josh Rank


Read Josh Rank’s “Drowning Without Sinking.”

1. What made you want to become a writer?

I took a creative writing class in college on a whim. I found myself continually looking around to come up with ideas for stories since we had to turn in quite a lot of writing for an introductory course. After the semester was over, I missed the amount of attention the class forced me pay to my surroundings. Aside from the exercise of analyzing events and motives and emotions, I found writing helped me to appreciate things in my day-to-day life, so I continued to do it.

2. What is your genre or writing style and has it changed over time?

I stick mostly to realism. Misunderstandings, disagreements, and arguments that I don’t allow myself to have in real life can find a nice home on the page. I also think it helps me understand the people I come into contact with on a daily basis. Instead of just saying What the hell is wrong with this person? it gives me the chance to find a possible reason for baffling behavior.

My writing was more surreal when I started, to the point where my teacher was baffled I hadn’t read Franz Kafka (I have since rectified this). I still enjoy dabbling with the magical once in a while, but it’s not as prevalent as it once was.

3. What has helped you the most in the writing pursuit?

Stephen King. Not that I met him personally (although I imagine we’d be best friends if we only had the chance). Up until a few years ago, I had only managed to get one story published and I was writing intermittently, and not very well. But then I read King’s craft book On Writing and it changed not only my attitude about writing, but the way I went about doing it. The results were almost immediate. I had a dozen stories published over the following year.

4. How would you describe your writing practice?

I like to think of it as a sprint. After finding the idea for a story, I will hammer out the first draft usually in one sitting (maybe two) and then let it sit. I’ll start working on something else until I get some distance from it, then rework the next draft as quickly as the first one. Sprint, rest. Sprint, rest. There are two building drafts, then a subtraction draft (the idea of taking 10% off the word count comes directly from On Writing), then a finalizing draft. Only after the last draft will I sometimes ask my girlfriend to look it over and find out if I wasted my time or if I should send it out for consideration.

5. What are you writing now?

I’m perpetually in the middle of finishing up some short stories, but my main goal right now (besides selling the novel I wrote last year) is to write a magical realist novella. I want to get back to the idea that anything is possible and let myself go crazy with it. The hard part will be to find a reason for the magical parts so people aren’t just walking through walls for no reason besides the fact that it’s cool.

6. Where can someone find out more about your work?

I am on twitter (@jpockets) and also have a website (www.joshrank.com) where I have links to every published short story. Twitter will have the quickest updates but I could use some traffic on the website to justify its existence.

Sara Codair

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Read Sara Codair’s “You Can’t Bribe The Dead.”

1. What made you want to become a writer?

I’ve always loved to make up stories. As a child, if I got bored, I’d just run around imagining some scenario in my head. Some of the characters were original, others were borrowed from my favorite TV shows. When I would get too many stories in my head, I would write them down. The stories didn’t diminish with age. At 28, I write more than ever.

The idea that I could be an author came later, in high school, when I decided reading was actually fun and not terribly boring. Seeing how other people put their ideas on a page made me realize that I could do it too if I learned how to translate ideas from the chaotic form they are born in to coherent, well-crafted prose.

2. What is your genre or writing style and has it changed over time?

Well, realism without the magic tends to be boring. Magic without the realism can feel shallow. Usually, if I can combine the two, I can have a deep story with the fantastical elements that I love.

3. What has helped you the most in the writing pursuit?

Obsession, flash fiction, and Jim Butcher.

  • Obsession: I will give up without it. Unless I am obsessed with something, I don’t always stick with it.
  • Flash Fiction: The ability to complete a story in one sitting made finishing, polishing and revising less overwhelming.
  • Jim Butcher: On a reddit forum, he shared a fun metaphor with aspiring writers. I don’t remember the exact wording, but it was something like this: if you are in a group of people being chased by bear, you don’t need to be the fastest runner, you just need to be faster than the person next to you. This keeps me inspired despite the hundreds of rejections I have received.

4. How would you describe your writing practice?

Addiction? I write, write, and write. I can’t sleep if I don’t write. I can’t function if I don’t write. My head will explode if I don’t write. I NEED to write.

Of course, there is more to it than simply writing. There is also revision. Without revision, my stories would just be mind vomit. Revising, resting, revising, getting feedback, revising, getting more feedback, revising and editing—essentially going through lots and lots of drafts, transforms the chaotic ideas into literature.

5. What are you writing now?

My big project is my YA novel, tentatively titled Out of Focus. Its urban fantasy grounded in realism. It has magic, demons and elves, but it also has mental illness, domestic violence and awkwardness. I’ve lost track of how many drafts there have been. I need to make a few more revisions, edit it, and start sending it to agents.

In addition to that, I usually a piece of flash or a short story I’m working on. These are a good way to justify procrastination. Sending the novel out means getting rejections. I can handle short story rejections, but the novel is my baby…

6. Where can someone find out more about your work?

My website, https://saracodair.com/, has a list of my publications. If the work is available for free online, that list will have a direct link to it. If it is in a book, it will link to a place where you can buy the book. Additionally, I post micro stories or poems on my blog, along with recipes, reflections on my work as a writing teacher, and cat photos. Additionally, I tweet about writing @shatteredsmooth.

If you want to support me and other writes, you can save 10% off of an anthology I am featured in, 100 Voices, by using the coupon code 100V86 on Centum Publishing’s website: bit.ly/100VoicesV1.

Matt Meade

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Read Matt Meade’s “Jeanette and the Beast.”

Matt Meade is a stay-at-home parent, a sit-in-front-of-the-computer freelancer, and a once-upon-a-time problem drinker. His fiction has appeared in The Sun Magazine, The Rag, Maudlin House, and elsewhere. Some of his work, as well as the one good picture he has of himself, can be found at matthewthomasmeade.com.

1. What made you want to become a writer?

In my “real” life I find it very difficult to express myself. I am known to say the wrong thing, at the wrong time, to the wrong person. I am often tongue-tied, not very quick, and sort of awkward. As a matter of fact, this question makes me quite nervous. I am so poor at communicating that I spend hours sitting in a dark room imagining scenarios that might properly convey my ideas. I think that it’s that failure to properly express myself that has made me so determined to write.

2. What is your genre or writing style and has it changed over time?

I sort of don’t believe in genre. Certainly the idea of genre can be useful in a broad sense, particularly when discussing fiction, but when I write I try to only let the tropes and clichés of genre act as a marker for what to avoid.

As far as how my writing has changed from my early writing to my current writing, the biggest difference is that my characters have all gotten fatter. And now none of them smoke cigarettes anymore.

3. What has helped you the most in the writing pursuit?

I never finished anything worthwhile until I stopped drinking. Don’t believe those folks, not even Lars Von Trier, when they tell you that they need to drink (or do heroine, or smoke weed, etc.) to be creative. All that stuff is fine, and I encourage it, but no one needs it to make interesting work. It took me a long time to realize that what you actually need to be creative is to get your heart kicked around a little bit. To get scared of something. To have something worth losing. If my work is ever interesting it is only because I managed to be honest with myself about something that terrified me, or moved me.

The other thing that has been enormously helpful to me is other writers. If any writer needs help in their pursuits, they should ask another writer. Writers will invest absurd amounts of their free time into another writer’s work. They don’t even need to believe the stuff is good. They will just do it because they believe in the concept of literature. Writing fiction is one of the last great religions of the world.

4. How would you describe your writing practice?

Every sentence I have ever written, including this one, is a victory over the temptation of turn-based strategy video games and pornography.

5. What are you writing now?

I am currently trying to write a novel about the most American of all art forms: professional wrestling.

6. Where can someone find out more about your work?

Most of my fiction is collected at my website www.matthewthomasmeade.com.
I also try to blog about music on a semi-regular basis for the music criticism collective www.oldschoolrecordreview.com. Come pick a fight with me in the comments section over whether or not Pavement is any good.

L. Soviero

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Click here to read L. Soviero’s “Leomande.”

L. Soviero was born in Queens, lives in Melbourne and studies creative writing on the web with the University of Edinburgh. Her most recent publications can be found at Maudlin House, Seizure and Star 82 Review.

1. What made you want to become a writer?

Like other writers, I’m a constant reader. Stories have come into my life at just the right moment, when I really needed to hear what they had to say. Call it coincidence, call it kismet, call it selective attention; any way you slice it I’ve always found life-changing literature very punctual. I love that something as subtle as words on a page has the power to push me in new directions, both physically and metaphorically. It made me want to be involved. And really, I feel a little less of a person without writing.

I also like making shit up.

2. What is your genre or writing style and has it changed over time?

We’re constantly dealing with, absorbing and processing our waking world. I don’t use magical realism to escape the waking world, but I do use it to play with it. Magical realism is sometimes a way of interpreting my dreams. I’ll take a dream that makes no sense and try to make sense of it on the page. In this way, magical realism acts as a connection between my conscious and subconscious mind.

3. What has helped you the most in the writing pursuit?

Honest. Constructive. Feedback.

My mom has also told me that when I was learning to walk, my brother would push down every time I got to my feet. She said I always had determination in my little baby eyes. This determination has remained with me, so I accept the knocks and blows that come in the form of rejection letters. No’s provide me with more juice than accolades (although the occasional yes is much appreciated).

4. How would you describe your writing practice?

Honestly … erratic. I write in my day job. I have strict deadlines there and I’ve never been a very scheduled person. Schedules scare me a bit. For my own writing, I just try to make as much time as I can and I don’t beat myself if I’m unable to tick off imaginary boxes.

In general, I like to write at night and I have a tendency to smash the keys like a gorilla.

5. What are you writing now?

Going back to putting my dreams on the page, I had a weird one recently where I went through a surgery to become a lady’s handbag, so turning that into a story at the moment, but I tend to always have a few things going.

6. Where can someone find out more about your work?

I needed a kick in the butt to get something in the way of an Internet presence going, so thanks Scrutiny for being that kick in the butt.

https://lsoviero.com/

Anna O’Brien

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Click here to read Anna O’Brien’s “Gran’s Centaur.”

Anna O’Brien is a freelance writer and veterinarian in Maryland. She is a contributing editor for the magazine Horse Illustrated and has had fiction published in The Reject Pile, Brilliant Flash Fiction, and Cease, Cows. She is a reader for The Indianola Review. She likes fat, slow dogs and fast bicycles. She has one of each.

1. What made you want to become a writer?

I’m not sure if there is only one thing that made me want to be a writer. I think mostly it had to do with the joy I found in reading, how intimate a story can be if the writing is honest and true. Writing is the one thing I’m good at so I sort of just continued with it.

2. What is your genre or writing style and has it changed over time?

The creativity I read in magical realism pieces makes me drool. It’s so good. I’m not a huge fan of hard core sci-fi or fantasy but just plain literary writing can be very dry and, I’ll just say it, boring. Magical realism, for me, is the perfect balance between the two. I love taking something, either a character or a situation, and imaging: what if? The fact that magical realism has no boundaries, no rules, makes it that much more enjoyable. Writing in this genre is basically playing around in dreamland.

3. What has helped you the most in the writing pursuit?

Two things. Firstly, joining a local writers group. The support and camaraderie has been so good for me, plus hearing the objective, constructive feedback when my pieces are up for critique. Being surrounded by writers who actually write is immensely inspiring. Secondly, my slow realization and coming to the understanding that writing, like any craft or hobby or job or sport, takes practice which requires discipline and time dedication. I’m an endurance runner, so comparing writing to training for a marathon makes sense to me. You don’t wake up one day and simply run 26 miles. It takes months (sometimes years) of training to get to that point. Same for writing. You don’t wake up and suddenly, based on pure inspiration alone, write the next best selling novel. It’s going to take time, practice, perseverance, and sometimes pain to get where I really want to be as an author. There are no short cuts.

4. How would you describe your writing practice?

I try to carve out time in the early morning to write. That way, I know I’ve gotten at least some writing in for the day, despite whatever may be thrown my way later. But nothing’s nicer than a quiet evening on the couch spent writing. That’s a luxury and more an exception than the rule. When I’m not feeling particularly creative or inspired, I’ll set a timer and just tell myself to get something down over the next 30 minutes. Taking that first step is the hardest part.

5. What are you writing now?

I’m struggling to finish a short story about some flowers that grow plates of food instead of blooms. I don’t know why it’s been so hard to finish it. I think maybe because there are many ways it can be told and I haven’t yet settled on how exactly I want to tell it. Plus, what’s come out so far is darker than I first intended. Isn’t it weird when that happens?

6. Where can someone find out more about your work?

I write a monthly blog called VetWrite. I’m a veterinarian in my day job and in my blog, I interview other vets who are writers, artists, and musicians. I like to explore the boundary between science and creativity and how it’s expressed in the veterinary industry. I’m also a contributing editor for the magazine Horse Illustrated and a blogger over at HobbyFarms.com. On my blog you’ll find more examples of both my fiction and non-fiction writing.

Sam Oches

Sam Oches is the managing editor and cofounder of Scrutiny, as well as the editorial director of a restaurant news media company. He is working on his first novel.

1. What made you want to become a writer?

I’ve always loved the written word, which probably started with my love for reading as a kid. Eventually it just seemed like something I should try to do myself. When I was in third grade, I wrote a short story about a killer lady bug (my childhood home used to get invaded by them every summer), and my teacher read it to the whole class. I loved the feeling I got in creating something as my own and sharing it with others.

When I was a teenager, though, the type of writing I did shifted into journalism. My parents had subscriptions to several newspapers and magazines, and I read all of them cover to cover. I loved the news, and I loved the structure of journalism and the way it held the power to tell the stories of others. I went to college at Ohio University to study journalism, and eventually fell in love with the idea of writing creative nonfiction, which gave me the ability to combine the artistic nature of storytelling with the powerful communication of journalism.

Of course, the harsh realities of graduating into the recession prevented me from pursuing creative nonfiction professionally. Instead, I ended up becoming an editor of a restaurant business magazine, which I grew to really love, particularly the ability to tell the stories of the people in the industry. I’ve even been able to work my creativity into a lot of my stories in that capacity. But I was hungry to get back into creative storytelling.

Enter my return to fiction writing. After a few stumbled attempts to start a now-defunct novel, I took a class through a local writing nonprofit that was taught by a well-known published author. It was in that class that I learned to love fiction writing again; it was in that class that I started by now-nearly-finished first novel; and it was in that class that I met several of the members of my writing group.

2. What is your genre or writing style and has it changed over time?

I guess you would call it literary fiction, but I’ve been influenced by a little bit of everything, and find that everything from absurdism to magical realism finds its way into my work. Not surprisingly, I tend to soak up the styles of my favorite writers, who include Kurt Vonnegut, Thomas Pynchon, Marilynne Robinson, and Thomas Wolf, among many, many others.

Having grown up in Appalachian Ohio, I find that those roots also influence my style a lot. I love the idea of telling the stories of those whose stories rarely get told, and in an authentic way; this is especially important when it comes to writing about Appalachia, which is so often misunderstood and misrepresented in pop culture. I’m currently enjoying Ron Rash’s work, as he really grasps the sensibilities of writing about Appalachia without it sounding cliche.

3. What has helped you the most in the writing pursuit?

Having a writing group, hands down. It’s been my own personal MFA. My writing group has been together now for four years, and I’ve learned on the fly what it means to write fiction from fellow group members. Having other people critique your work to your face is enormously terrifying, but also humbling and educational. It forces you out of the bubble of your own little writing world, which (shocker!) is necessary if you want to advance your writing at all, both personally and professionally.

My advice to other writers is to find a writing group immediately. If you can’t find one, start one. If you don’t know any other writers, take a class or poke around online until you find a community you can tap into.

4. How would you describe your writing practice?

I would describe it as a little crazy, but efficient. I wake up at 5 a.m. most weekday mornings to write my fiction. As a full-time journalist, I find that my brain power for creative writing is zilch after 5 p.m., so the only time I can really commit to writing creatively is the early morning between 5 and 7 a.m. The first few weeks doing this were brutal, but once it became routine, I found that it wasn’t such a big deal. I set the goal of writing at least 300 words every day (not a ton but I’m not a very fast writer, plus I edit as I go) and it’s helped me to methodically whittle away at my first novel and about a dozen short stories that I’ve written.

5. What are you writing now?

I’m finishing my first novel, called “Mountain Man.” It’s taken me four years to write, but has been enormously fulfilling, and an incredible education as I’ve figured out along the way what it means to write something so substantial. I’ve also got several short stories under my belt, one currently published at Scrutiny Journal, which I co-edit with Justin Meckes. Hopefully others will be published soon too!

6. Where can someone find out more about your work?

My first published short story is live on Scrutiny. That’s the extent of it, for now, but once I wrap this novel and start focusing on getting it and more of my short stories published, I hope to have more of an online presence to get my name out there. In the meantime, I share my restaurant stories at my twitter handle, @SamQSR.